Medicated Food For Koi and Aquarium Fish

It's been impossible (in the last couple years) to find and buy medicated food to save fish with bacterial infections but now there are easy ways to make such food successfully. 

It helps to forge a relationship with a legitimate veterinarian who can prescribe antimicrobials, but that's not always available. Weekend card table shot-clinic-vets are "special" in that they aren't regulated by laws that pertain to brick and mortar vets. For example they don't have to have a license to practice in your town or location. They can legally prescribe drugs for a pet they gave shots to one weekend at a feed store, and will never see again. So they have a lot of privileges granted by the FDA and the local VMA's – – that your regular vet can't compete with. So they can be enlisted. But you can also get antibiotics online as long as it has a picture of a fish on the label –  apparently that makes it legal to sell antibiotics over the counter without a prescription. Resources are listed in the article I'm referencing here

How To Make Medicated Food Easily and Successfully

The idea is that you can use edible shellac (confectioner's glaze) and bind the medications to the pellet of the appropriate size and kind. And it doesn't float off in the water the way the old old-binding methods did. 

 

Fishdoc.co.uk And Microscope Training

Fishdoc.co.uk And Microscope Training

Over at fishdoc.co.uk there are about ten pages that take you through how to use a microscope. The detail is great, and the author is good at educating a non-technical person. Frank Prince-Iles wrote these tutorials probably 19 years ago. Not much has changed, but the articles were updated with some newer microscope parts. 

You learn about the parts of the microscope, what you can see and learn with a microscope, how to use the different parts and abilities of a microscope and even a suggestion on what to look for in a reasonable student scope

Nothing is left out. There are even movies of all the different parasites you could see. 

It's only going to get a LITTLE better when drjohnson.com uses some of that detail, and couples it with video using a SPECIFIC microscope that everyone should own, at least, anyone thinking about buying a microscope. 

 

https://fishdoc.co.uk/category/the-lab-microscope/

Treating Infections and Ulcers in Koi and Goldfish

Treating Infections and Ulcers in Koi and Goldfish

Besides discovering and correcting environmental problems with the situation, attacking bacterial infections in Koi and Goldfish is a large undertaking. Especially if the infection is impacting the ability of the fish to breathe: The GILLS

The facilities can be very large as in the case of ponds. In fact, so large you can't actually HOLD the fish for treatment. 

The following article discusses how to treat bacterial infections when you CAN hold the fish for treatment, and when you CANNOT hold the fish, also discusses what to do in colder water versus warmer water. 

There are related articles, like how to SHOT GUN parasites in the scenarios with bacterial infections on your goldfish or Koi. 

Always, a microscope is the best way to protect yourself from guessing. 

http://fishtreatments.com/how-to-treat-bacterial-infections-in-ponds-and-goldfish/

We're going to do a video tutorial, step by step using this Celestron LCD microscope. Look for it on drjohnson.com 

 

Thank you for your kind attention! 

 

Fish Diseases Fixed By A Good Environment?

Fish Diseases Fixed By A Good Environment?

It's been said that "If you take care of the water, the fish take care of themselves" and I believe there's a BIG grain of truth in that. 

So much so, that I honestly believe that if you provided 90% of species of aquarium or pond fish with the following conditions, they could survive almost anything:

  1. 78 DF temperatures
  2. High aeration
  3. Sponge filtration properly cycled and 
  4. Tested to prove supported pH and nitrogen
  5. Buffered pH and 
  6. Plenty of space 

And so an article pulls all that together from "soup to nuts" with complete instructions and where to find the best deals on the best gear. 

How To Provide A Perfect Place For FIsh To Quarantine or Recover

Written by fish veterinarian Dr Erik Johnson and recommending ONLY things he has bought and tested in his own home, or fish room. 

If you were to follow this advice, and then treat your fish for their actual illness, I think you could hardly ever lose. 

 

 

New Resources When Treating Fish Diseases

Resources when facing fish health diseases, symptoms of illness like white spot, and parasite treatments.

There is a lot of information on the internet but it can come from inexperienced sources, and in many cases now, may be a 'bad-translation' of stolen content. It's a "thing" these days. 
"Change enough words and it's not plagiarism!" so they say. And when non-English speakers are 'changing words' I've seen some amazing errors.

The best fish health information can be found on DrJohnson.com because it's coming from ONE person and not a panel of self proclaimed experts. (Forums) 
Other sites in the same family include: Fishdoc.co.uk and Koivet.com 

But, sometimes you don't want a computer near the pond, and prefer details in a written paperback format so, perhaps your best bet is Dr Erik Johnson's textbook "Koi Health & Disease" 2
It's written in a cookbook "How to" format that almost anyone could understand. It's been well reviewed. In fact, the ONLY criticism of the book on Amazon.com is that the images inside the book are black-and-white greyscale. You don't lose any information with that, but people expect full color these days. 
Another resource is Fishtreatments.com (A sister site to drjohnson.com) Things are different on that site. 
At that Fishtreatments web site, which calls itself a "What To Buy For That Bug" web site, you get the symptom, plus a brief description and then HOW TO TREAT IT. 
You'll see an emphasis on improving water quality but you're not left wondering how to do that. Everything is spelled out from lighting to filtration, medications and resources on how to use them – 
The site focuses on Amazon.com-availability because they have Prime shipping, which allows virtually overnight delivery of most things. 
You're just LUCKIER when your local pond supplies store has everything in stock. 
Many times they do. 

https://drjohnson.com/thebook/
https://fishtreatments.com
https://amzn.to/2wTqgGR  The Book via Prime

What Goes Into a Fish House Call Kit?

Veterinarian Dr Erik Johnson (koivet) illustrates and explains his housecall kit. From the space saving microscope to the kinds of test kits brought to bear. Everything fits into a Pelican 1500 box. 

The page will be presented live in March, 2020 in North Carolina to a group of hobbyists, vets and retailers along with a Wet Lab and a seminar on "What Really Matters" in Water Quality. 

Here's the Pond Call Kit 

 

Titanium Heaters For the Win – A+ Recommend Affordable

I have owned just about every kind of aquarium heater over the years from the ancient glass hang on heaters to the newest titanium bodied heaters. The price on the titanium heaters has come down to one that is very reasonable and fully worth it. Have a listen to my brief podcast on choosing an aquarium heater and why you should consider buying titanium.
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DrJohnson.com Article / Case on Koi Herpes Virus

The following comes from DrJohnson.com about cross contamination of Koi via Goldfish. It was a case in the Ask The Doc section of the site. 

Link to the full article on DrJohnson.com 

Dr Johnson,

I got your address from my friend Jason who you recsrc=https://drjohnson.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/koi-970339_1280_koi_pixabay.jpgently helped with a pecan nut problem.

I may or may not have a KHV problem. If I can give you the story I hope you can tell me if there is anything I should do.

I dug a pond last fall and have 2, 5 inch koi doing fine in it. I have 5, 4 inch koi inside doing very well.

I have a lotus in a whiskey barrel that I've had for sometime and put cheap goldfish in for mosquitoes. They usually die quickly and I never thought much about it until I started reading about KHV and saw pics of Koi with KHV. I remember one of the gold fish having a dark patch on its gill cover that looked like a post mortem shot of a koi with KHV.

I have wintered umbrella palms in the lotus barrel.

So my questions.

1. Should I be concerned

2. Is there a nucleic acid test that can test water

3. Is there a non-invasive nucleic acid test for fish

4. At what point should I bring the outdoor fish to you before I move the indoor fish out.

5. Should I throw out the plants or is it safe to put them in the pond

If there are any products I need to purchase from you, please let me know.

Thank you

My Answer:

Koi Herpes Virus is not a legitimate liability to goldfish owners.
Testing is a mixed bag – – because if you test and it's positive, you have to (by law) go on record with the Federal Government. It's a "legally reportable" disease so the testing agency has to 'tell on you' and that COULD POTENTIALLY mean that you have to surrender your fish to the Fed and the pond gets drained and closed.

Any Koi that carries KHV in cold water will "break" with it when it's warmed to 70-78 DF
Any Koi that is infected with KHV will 'get over it' when it's warmed to 84 DF.
They're not considered ''cured''. By anyone but me, and also everyone in Israel.

The plants (left without fish for a week or two) will bring no diseases with them to a receiving facility. I can say that with even more certainty if the plants are in the seventies DF when you quarantine them.

So if you think the Koi outdoors are harboring KHV all you have to do is bring one up to 75 degrees and give it a week to break.

And if it doesn't, you're golden, on the KHV issue.

Besides a few recommendations on Amazon.com about heaters and air pumps, I don't officially "sell" anything so you're good there 🙂

Doc

Stop Water Changes and Go With Water Replacement

I've been through some aquarium filters. And I do keep coming back to sponge filters. And I have powered them with air, and also with water pumps. 

Right now, and for the last two or three years, I am depending on CAF250 Sponge Filters. They are built to handle 250 gallon systems and I found them on Amazon at a typographical price. They've always been $27-$35 dollars.  Then I found someone selling them for $10 and I've bought like, twenty of them. 

I like sponge filters because: 

  1. They run via airpressure, and airstones will oxygenate the tank while the sponge cleans it
  2. The sponge filters can't suck up food or a fish
  3. The sponge filters host tons of beneficial bacteria 
  4. The sponge filters are easy to clean. VERY easy to clean. 
  5. Sponge filters last a VERY long time. 

In this article (link) I've shown you the filters, and linked a way to get them for $10. It's February 2020 so I don't know when you're reading this or if the sponge filters will still be ten bucks when you look. 

But they're called CAF250 Sponge Filters. They're made by AquaTop. 

If my link is broken in this article, please pop over to DrJOhnson.com and let me know using the contact form. (Ask the Doc) 

Thanks

 

Doc Johnson

The